Dog Guard® Out of Sight Fencing®

800-865-0495

20 Gurley Ave. Suite B1 Troy, NY 12182 | Email: Info@dogguardblog.com

About

Dog Guard® Out Of Sight Fence® understands: Your dog is family.

out of sight dog fence

We Love Your Dog Too!

Dog Guard® Out-of-Sight®  Dog Fence  knows just how important it is that your dog leads a safe and happy life. Dog Guard® “Out of Sight Fencing” allows your dog the freedom he deserves and provides you with peace of mind. Dog Guard® Out-of-Sight® Electronic Dog Fencing is a safe, affordable alternative to conventional fencing.

Dog Guard®  offers Out-of-Sight® Electronic Dog Fencing, veterinarian-approved, combination of animal training and state-of-the art electronics. Dog Guard Out-of-Sight Electronic Dog Fencing is a unique 2 zone T-4 transmitter allows a wide variety of corrections to be set for your pet at the transmitter depending on your dog and it’s temperament

 

Taking Care Of Your Pets

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Taking Care Of Your Pets

PROVIDE A CLEAN LIVING SPACE YOUR DOG. Shelter from the outside elements and hazards, as well as good hygiene, are basic to a quality life.

ALWAYS KEEP FRESH WATER AVAILABLE. Maintaining optimal hydration is important for health and energy.

FEED A QUALITY DIET AND PREVENT OBESITY. Overweight humans and animals can adversely affect health in many ways. Follow the dietary recommendations that your veterinarian will make according to the nutritional needs of your dog, based on size, age, level of activity and breed. Remember to provide healthy treats rather than table scraps, as rewards.

HAVE YOUR PET EXAMINED BY A VETERINARIAN ON A REGULAR BASIS. Your veterinarian will provide you with the information on vaccination schedules, deworming and external parasite control. Keep a copy of your pet’s vaccination records in your home or with you when you travel. Contact your veterinarian if you believe that your pet may be ill, injured, or if something just doesn’t seem right. Your veterinarian is the expert on keeping your dog healthy. Work as a team with him or her.
PROVIDE AMPLE OPPORTUNITIES TO EXERCISE. Make sure your dog gets the regular exercise needed to enable it to be fit. By being in shape, your dog will be more capable of participating in the activities that it enjoys.

COMMUNICATE WITH YOUR DOG AND DEVELOP A RELATIONSHIP. Dogs are social creatures and they need to interact with their owner. Quality time will help you get to know your dog and understand particular needs that it might have, as well enhance your ability to recognize early signs of an illness that could be developing. In addition, time spent in developing a relationship will help prevent many undesirable behavioral patterns.

TRAIN YOUR DOG TO FOLLOW THE SIMPLE COMMANDS. Puppy and dog training classes can be very helpful. The better your dog is at following basic and necessary commands, the greater the chances are that your dog will live a safe and long life.

PRACTICE REPRODUCTIVE CONTROL. If you do not intend to create puppies, spaying or neutering is a certain option. If you plan to breed your dog or are opposed to spaying and neutering for other reasons, take appropriate measures to prevent mismatings. Consult with your veterinarian in regard to other options that are available.

DENTAL CARE IS VERY IMPORTANT. Many breeds are prone to gum disease, which can have serious implications. Infection resulting from this condition leads to premature tooth loss, and can commonly cause infections in major organs, including the heart valves.

DON’T OVERLOOK GROOMING AND NAIL TRIMMING. Long coated dogs are prone to developing matts and ice balls in their hair. Overgrown nails are common in elderly dogs and can make it more difficult for them to walk. In addition, such nails are much more prone to breaking, which can be quite painful.

Dogs Get Lonely Too

Posted by on 3:37 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Dogs Get Lonely Too

Dogs Get Lonely Too

Your dog has a complex brain, and he will miss you when you are gone just like a child!

Stanley is a “momma’s boy.”  For those who don’t know, it means he REALLY loves his human mom, and whenever she’s gone, Stanley notices and gets a bit depressed.  So, Stanley’s human dad set up a phone call for him with his mom while she was away, and the whole thing was captured on video.  Be warned, it’s about the cutest thing we’ve seen in quite some time.

Read more: http://www.lifewithdogs.tv/2017/07/stanley-was-missing-his-mom-so-his-dad-set-up-a-phone-call-and-its-the-cutest-thing-weve-ever-seen/

Aging in Place with Pets

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Aging in Place with Pets

From companionship to security, pets can provide seniors a better quality of live and improve aging in place.

Are you wondering how you are going to care for your pet as you age in place? Are you wondering if you should adopt a pet as you age in place? This guide will help you decide on the best choice for you.

Learn more: http://www.aginginplace.org/seniors-and-pets/

Studies have shown that owning a pet can be physically and mentally beneficial for people of all ages. In the case of senior citizens, “just 15 minutes bonding with an animal sets off a chemical chain reaction in the brain, lowering levels of the fight-or-flight hormone, cortisol, and increasing production of the feel-good hormone serotonin. The result: heart rate, blood pressure and stress levels immediately drop. Over the long term, pet and human interactions can lower cholesterol levels, fight depression and may even help protect against heart disease and stroke” (Byrne, 2015).

July 4th safety tips for pets

Posted by on 3:32 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on July 4th safety tips for pets

July 4th safety tips for pets

Help your dogs, cats handle fireworks

Everyone loves July 4th, right? Well, not pets.

Independence Day fireworks can be torture for animals and more pets – spooked by the noise and lights – are reported lost on July 4th than any other day.

“The Fourth of July means more animals showing up in animal shelters and in animal hospitals as a result of the fear induced by fireworks and other celebratory activities,” the American Veterinary Medical Association said. “Animals might hurt themselves when they get scared and try to escape, and you’ll spend your holiday searching for a lost pet if they do successfully escape.”

What can you do to help your dog and other pets weather the fireworks storm? Here are some tips from the American Veterinary Medical Association:

  • Make sure pets – cats and dogs – have identification tags with up-to-date information before July 4th. If your pet isn’t microchipped, consider having it done – it can greatly improve your chances of getting the animal back if it does run.
  • Take your pet for a walk before it gets dark and the fireworks start.
  • Don’t take your pets to public places where you know there will be fireworks, parades or other loud gatherings. The combination of the noise, an unfamiliar place and crowds can cause the even more fright for the animal.
  • Keep your pets inside if you’re setting off fireworks. Turn on the television or radio to a low volume to help mask outside noises.
  • Close the curtain or blinds.
  • Provide your pet with a safe space, such as a kennel or crate.
  • Keep sparklers, glow sticks, charcoal, etc. away from pets.
  • If you must take your pet outside, keep them on a leash.
  • After the fireworks show, check your yard for debris before allowing your pet back outside.
  • If your pet has a history of extreme reactions to fireworks, talk to your vet about tranquilizers.

Other safety tips

  • Make sure pets have water if they are joining in the outdoor fun.
  • Don’t leave alcoholic drinks where pets can access them. Alcohol can be deadly to pets.
  • Do not apply sunscreen to pets unless it is designed for their use. Human sunscreen can be poisonous to animals if ingested.
  • Keep glow sticks, citronella candles and tiki torches out of pet’s reach. All contain substances that can be harmful to animals.
  • Don’t let pets get near your barbecue grill while it is in use or still hot.

Reprinted from: http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2017/07/july_4th_safety_tips_for_pets.html

Flea Season Is Here

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Flea Season Is Here

Fleas are more than an irritation; they can cause a range of illnesses in dogs. The problem is that, unless they are allergic to flea saliva, dogs don’t always scratch when they have fleas. To complicate matters more, fleas are sly and great at hiding. So how can you determine if your dog has fleas?

Know Where the Fleas Like to Gather

The most common congregating spot for fleas is around the base of your dog’s tail and her lower back. You can certainly find them anywhere on your dog’s body but if there are only a few fleas and you want the best chance of finding them, start there.

Push the Fur Backwards to Get a Better View

Fleas don’t waste much time on top of your dog’s fur. They need to get down to your dog’s skin in order to sink their mouthparts into their host and drink blood. The best way for you to see your dog’s skin is to gently push the fur backwards with your hand.

Don’t Center All of Your Hopes on Seeing an Actual Flea

Fleas are sneaky and there aren’t always very many of them on your dog at once. You’ll need to put on your detective hat and look for more than just live fleas. The other evidence that these pesky pests are nibbling on your canine pal is their excrement. They leave flea feces wherever they go.

Flea stool impersonates small specks of black dirt, so it is called “flea dirt.”

Look for and collect any dirt that you find during your visual flea hunt and also when you search with a flea comb

If you take some of the dirt look-a-likes, place them on a white paper towel, sprinkle water on them, then give them a little rub, you will see red smudges appear. This is a definitive answer for you: your dog has fleas. The reason the flea dirt turns red is because it is just digested blood.

If you haven’t spotted fleas or flea dirt at this point, grab a flea comb and run it all over your dog, stopping every swipe or two to examine the comb’s tines. Look for fleas and flea dirt. Fleas can slip through the bristles of a regular brush, but a flea comb’s tines are too close together for the critters to squeeze between. You can catch them this way, but be ready to put them in some soapy water or squish them really hard.

Visiting The Vet

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Visiting The Vet

Consider taking your dog to the vet for a general check-up. It’s a good idea to make sure your dog’s vaccinations and other shots are up-to-date. That way you know your dog is starting the season with good health.

Get Groomed

This helps get rid of dead hair and dandruff. Brushing your dog will also help you prevent your dog’s hair from getting snarled and matted. You can go to a professional groomer or get a brush and regularly brush your dog at home.

Get Active

If you and your dog found yourselves spending most of the freezing winter in hibernation, start ramping up your walk routine so that your dog can shed some of that winter weight. This is a great chance for dog owners to tone up for spring too! Before you let your dog run free in the yard, here’s a quick checklist to make sure your dog stays safe outdoors:

Check your yard to make sure there are no holes in the fence where your dog could wriggle out. You also want to be sure that there are no harmful chemicals, fertilizers, weed killers, or ice melts lying around where your dog could eat or roll in them.

Have a defense plan against mosquitos, ticks, fleas, heartworms, etc.

Check your dog’s leash and collar. If they are frayed, it may be time for a replacement.

Make sure your dog’s identification tags are up-to-date

Tips For Dog Owners

Posted by on 4:32 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Tips For Dog Owners

Tips For Dog Owners

Nice weather is coming so the opportunities for our pets to join us for some spring and summer time fun.

  1. Get Your Dog Use to Busy Places

While some locations are great places to socialize your dog, they can also be overwhelming. If your dog has been cooped up all winter, then a crowd of people or a busy down town might be a bit of a shock. To help your dog get used to all the noise and attention, feed your dog treats frequently.

  1. Getting Your Dog Use to Water

Going for a swim in your favorite lake, river, or pool is a great way to to cool off. But before you jump in and expect your canine companion to join you, it is best to help them get used to the idea. Slowly expose them to the water in a shallow area and make sure that interacting with the water is their choice

  1. Sporting Events and Picnics

Bringing your dog to a baseball game or neighborhood picnic can be a fun for all. Bring a blanket or mat for your dog to rest on while you root for your team. Reward your dog for staying in place with a treat and help them stay in place for a longer duration with a favorite toy .

  1. Behaviors for Outdoor Food Establishments

While you and your dog are waiting in line for your tasty treats, it is a good idea to practice polite manners. Reward your dog for sitting by your side while in line. To ensure others in line also have a great experience, make sure you only allow your dog to greet strangers who invite them to say hi.

  1. Getting Your Dog Ready for Long Car Rides

Vacations and day trips are the highlight of the spring and summer seasons. Bringing our dogs along is meant to make the experience even better. You can give them a favorite Kong or chew toy to work on during the trip. For longer trips remember to stop frequently to let your dog stretch their legs and go to the bathroom.

Tips For Dog Owners

Posted by on 4:31 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Tips For Dog Owners

Tips For Dog Owners

Nice weather is coming so the opportunities for our pets to join us for some spring and summer time fun.

  1. Get Your Dog Use to Busy Places

While some locations are great places to socialize your dog, they can also be overwhelming. If your dog has been cooped up all winter, then a crowd of people or a busy down town might be a bit of a shock. To help your dog get used to all the noise and attention, feed your dog treats frequently.

  1. Getting Your Dog Use to Water

Going for a swim in your favorite lake, river, or pool is a great way to to cool off. But before you jump in and expect your canine companion to join you, it is best to help them get used to the idea. Slowly expose them to the water in a shallow area and make sure that interacting with the water is their choice

  1. Sporting Events and Picnics

Bringing your dog to a baseball game or neighborhood picnic can be a fun for all. Bring a blanket or mat for your dog to rest on while you root for your team. Reward your dog for staying in place with a treat and help them stay in place for a longer duration with a favorite toy .

  1. Behaviors for Outdoor Food Establishments

While you and your dog are waiting in line for your tasty treats, it is a good idea to practice polite manners. Reward your dog for sitting by your side while in line. To ensure others in line also have a great experience, make sure you only allow your dog to greet strangers who invite them to say hi.

  1. Getting Your Dog Ready for Long Car Rides

Vacations and day trips are the highlight of the spring and summer seasons. Bringing our dogs along is meant to make the experience even better. You can give them a favorite Kong or chew toy to work on during the trip. For longer trips remember to stop frequently to let your dog stretch their legs and go to the bathroom.

Spring Health Tips

Posted by on 4:29 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Spring Health Tips

Spring Health Tips

Dogs tend to love spring because they get to spend more time outdoors. After being cooped up during the winter it is a joy for them to be able to take advantage of the lengthening and warming days to release all of their pent up winter energy. It is equally joyful for us watching our dogs have a good time. However the warmer days bring about certain health concerns so take a moment and make sure your dog is fully prepared for spring.
Depending on where you live mosquitoes start becoming more active. Generally heartworm preventative medication should be given year round to prevent infection because mosquitoes thrive year round in many parts of the country and as our climate continues to warm mosquitoes tend to stay active longer each year. Despite this some pet owners do not give heartworm preventatives in the winter so spring is a good time of year to make sure your dog has been checked for heartworm and is current on his heartworm preventative medication. The cost of heartworm preventative medication is a bargain when compared to how much it costs to treat heartworm disease.
In addition to mosquitoes, ticks and fleas become more prevalent as well. There are a variety of products available to combat these nuisances, so ask your veterinarian which one is best for your dog. Start early as preventing ticks and fleas from becoming a problem is far easier than dealing with a major flea infestation and get into the habit of regularly checking your dog for ticks. Ticks are typically found around the head, on the ears, neck, chest and forelegs although they can be found anywhere. Usually it is easier to find them by feeling for them instead of looking depending on how long your dog’s coat is.
Spring is a good time to check and make sure your dog’s vaccinations are up to date. Dog to dog contact increases in the spring and continues on into the Summer months. Your dog is exposed to more infectious diseases during this time of year. For example many veterinary clinics start to see increased incidence of kennel cough in the spring because of increasing dog-to-dog contact.
Spring for some people means it is time to plan and start your garden. Selecting plants that are safe for dogs will go a long way in preventing toxicities from occurring. Keep in mind that some dogs can enjoy digging as much as we do so avoid planting toxic bulbs such as hyacinths, tulips, daffodils and certain lilies. Fertilizers and mulch can be toxic as well so store them in an inaccessible area like a shed when not in use and do not allow your dog in the garden area.
With spring generally comes spring cleaning. Be aware that many household cleaning products are harmful to dogs so follow instructions as posted on the label and store all chemicals out of reach when not in use.
With spring rains come spring mud, keep your dog’s feet dry and your house clean by keeping a towel near the door and perhaps in your car as well.
Spring means fun times for dogs (and humans) so pick up the leash and go for a walk or hit the dog park. You are bound to notice a little spring in your dog’s steps.

Spring Health Tips

Posted by on 3:11 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Spring Health Tips

Spring Health Tips

Dogs tend to love spring because they get to spend more time outdoors. After being cooped up during the winter it is a joy for them to be able to take advantage of the lengthening and warming days to release all of their pent up winter energy. It is equally joyful for us watching our dogs have a good time. However the warmer days bring about certain health concerns so take a moment and make sure your dog is fully prepared for spring.
Depending on where you live mosquitoes start becoming more active. Generally heartworm preventative medication should be given year round to prevent infection because mosquitoes thrive year round in many parts of the country and as our climate continues to warm mosquitoes tend to stay active longer each year. Despite this some pet owners do not give heartworm preventatives in the winter so spring is a good time of year to make sure your dog has been checked for heartworm and is current on his heartworm preventative medication. The cost of heartworm preventative medication is a bargain when compared to how much it costs to treat heartworm disease.
In addition to mosquitoes, ticks and fleas become more prevalent as well. There are a variety of products available to combat these nuisances, so ask your veterinarian which one is best for your dog. Start early as preventing ticks and fleas from becoming a problem is far easier than dealing with a major flea infestation and get into the habit of regularly checking your dog for ticks. Ticks are typically found around the head, on the ears, neck, chest and forelegs although they can be found anywhere. Usually it is easier to find them by feeling for them instead of looking depending on how long your dog’s coat is.
Spring is a good time to check and make sure your dog’s vaccinations are up to date. Dog to dog contact increases in the spring and continues on into the Summer months. Your dog is exposed to more infectious diseases during this time of year. For example many veterinary clinics start to see increased incidence of kennel cough in the spring because of increasing dog-to-dog contact.
Spring for some people means it is time to plan and start your garden. Selecting plants that are safe for dogs will go a long way in preventing toxicities from occurring. Keep in mind that some dogs can enjoy digging as much as we do so avoid planting toxic bulbs such as hyacinths, tulips, daffodils and certain lilies. Fertilizers and mulch can be toxic as well so store them in an inaccessible area like a shed when not in use and do not allow your dog in the garden area.
With spring generally comes spring cleaning. Be aware that many household cleaning products are harmful to dogs so follow instructions as posted on the label and store all chemicals out of reach when not in use.
With spring rains come spring mud, keep your dog’s feet dry and your house clean by keeping a towel near the door and perhaps in your car as well.
Spring means fun times for dogs (and humans) so pick up the leash and go for a walk or hit the dog park. You are bound to notice a little spring in your dog’s steps.