Dog Guard® Out of Sight Fencing®

800-865-0495

20 Gurley Ave. Suite B1 Troy, NY 12182 | Email: Info@dogguardblog.com

About

Dog Guard® Out Of Sight Fence® understands: Your dog is family.

out of sight dog fence

We Love Your Dog Too!

Dog Guard® Out-of-Sight®  Dog Fence  knows just how important it is that your dog leads a safe and happy life. Dog Guard® “Out of Sight Fencing” allows your dog the freedom he deserves and provides you with peace of mind. Dog Guard® Out-of-Sight® Electronic Dog Fencing is a safe, affordable alternative to conventional fencing.

Dog Guard®  offers Out-of-Sight® Electronic Dog Fencing, veterinarian-approved, combination of animal training and state-of-the art electronics. Dog Guard Out-of-Sight Electronic Dog Fencing is a unique 2 zone T-4 transmitter allows a wide variety of corrections to be set for your pet at the transmitter depending on your dog and it’s temperament

 

Woofstock Amazing Stupid Dog Tricks

Posted by on 7:02 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Woofstock Amazing Stupid Dog Tricks

Woofstock Amazing Stupid Dog Tricks

Woofstock Amazing Dog Tricks – what can your dog do that will amaze the world? Get out your camera or smart phone and make your dog a star on Youtube!

Dog develops unique friendship with koi fish

Posted by on 7:18 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Dog develops unique friendship with koi fish

Dog develops unique friendship with koi fish

Dogs make special friendships with all sorts of people and animals. A Dutch Shepherd named Wiebe has made a unique friendship with his family’s koi carp. He even enjoys giving the fish kisses.

When Wiebe was just a puppy he was afraid of his family’s Eindhoven, Holland pond. He eventually warmed up to the pond and soon grew to love it. Every time he returns home from a walk with his owner, Dorri Eijsermans, he runs to the pond to get a drink of water.

Read more: http://www.lifewithdogs.tv/2013/11/dog-develops-unique-friendship-with-familys-koi-fish/

Is your dog the master of your house?

Posted by on 6:45 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Is your dog the master of your house?

Is your dog the master of your house?

Is your dog the master of your house? Check out the dog vs. cat video of the week!

Boy risks life to save dog

Posted by on 7:13 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Boy risks life to save dog

Boy risks life to save dog

When a dog was hit by a car in Brazil and left helpless in the middle of the road a young boy came to his rescue. 11-year-old Jean Fernandes risked his life to bring the dog to safety.

Read more: http://www.lifewithdogs.tv/2013/12/young-boy-risks-life-to-save-dog-hit-by-car/

Check out the dog vs. cat video of the week!

Posted by on 6:47 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Check out the dog vs. cat video of the week!

Check out the dog vs. cat video of the week!

Check out the dog vs. cat video of the week!

Dog saves lady

Posted by on 7:11 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Dog saves lady

Dog saves lady

An elderly woman was sound asleep when a fire broke out in her home early Thursday morning. She was able to safely escape thanks to her dog Pokie.

Dorothy “Dottie” Parker was asleep Thursday morning when her dog Polka Dot “Pokie” started to bark at her. It was around 8:30 a.m. and Dottie had no idea that her house was on fire.

“I had slept in and Pokie came to me barking,” said Parker.

Once Pokie woke Dottie up the dog began running up and down the hall barking and when Dottie went to investigate she found smoke and realized her mobile home was on fire. Dottie called the fire department for help and then got herself and Pokie safely out of the home.

Read more: http://www.lifewithdogs.tv/2013/12/dog-saves-elderly-woman-from-fire/

Canine Body Language (part 10)

Posted by on 9:45 am in DogGuard | Comments Off on Canine Body Language (part 10)

Canine Body Language (part 10)

Fearful, Scared

When your dog is scared, he does his best to look small. Often, his body looks hunched, with his tail held low or tucked between his rear legs and his ears flattened back on his skull. He might cower close to the ground. If escape is possible, he might lean so that his center of gravity is over his rear legs to permit a hasty retreat, or lean to the side so that he can recoil. He might look directly at the source of his fear or he might look away. The muscles of his body and face are tense and rigid. He might yawn in an exaggerated way.

Dominant Dogs

During interaction with a person or another dog, dogs sometimes convey a confident, assertive attitude that’s often called “dominant.” If your dog is feeling dominant, he stands tall, sometimes on his tiptoes, and tries to look large. He arches his neck. He appears tense, like a coiled spring. His weight is squarely on all four feet or he’s leaning forward slightly. His ears are up and oriented forward. His tail is high and rigid, sometimes flagging or quivering at the end. His hair may or may not be standing up on his shoulders or along his back. He usually makes direct eye contact with the other individual. He might growl, but his mouth will typically be closed.

Submissive Dogs

If your dog is feeling submissive while he interacts with a person or another dog, he tries to convey the message that he’s the underling, that he’s not a threat and that aggression is unnecessary. During active submission, he makes his body look small by hunching over and getting low to the ground. He holds his tail low or tucked, sometimes rapidly wagging it back and forth. He flattens his ears or holds them off to the sides of his head. He keeps his neck low to the ground, but he turns his muzzle up toward the other individual. He might nuzzle, lick or flick his tongue. He averts his gaze so as not to look directly at the other individual. Some dogs, particularly puppies, urinate. (Please see our article, Submissive Urination, for information about how to resolve this problem.)

Your dog might switch from active submission to a more passive position, in which he lies down and rolls over on his back to display his inguinal area (his genitalia). During passive submission, your dog might lie still, or he might paw at the other individual. He looks away. He might whine. Some dogs, particularly puppies, urinate in this position.

 

Read more: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/canine-body-language

Happy New Years

Posted by on 12:47 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Happy New Years

Happy New Years

Happy New Year 2014!

May your year be full of fur and fun with your favorite dog!

The folks at Dog Guard wish you and your furry family the best for 2014!

Who’s gonna win, dog or cat

Posted by on 6:59 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Who’s gonna win, dog or cat

Check out the dog vs. cat video of the week!

Canine Body Language (part 9)

Posted by on 4:44 pm in DogGuard | Comments Off on Canine Body Language (part 9)

Canine Body Language (part 9)

Excited Dog

When your dog is excited, he looks as intense as he does when he’s alert, but he might also adopt a playful demeanor. His body is ready for action. He looks natural in size, but his weight might be centered over his rear legs as he prepares to move. His ears are up and his tail is held high, and it may or may not wag. He looks at the individual or object that’s the source of his excitement. Excited dogs often hold their mouths open, and they might bark.

Aroused Dog

When your dog is aroused, you might have a hard time distinguishing it from when he’s alert or excited. The only time it’s useful to know the difference is when the arousal pushes him closer to feeling frightened or aggressive. An aroused dog almost always has his hackles up. However, just about everything else about his body language depends on whether he’s feeling scared, uncertain or angry. His body may look normal-sized or larger, his ears might be flattened to the side or held forward, and his tail might be held low, in a normal position or high. He may or may not be looking directly at an individual or object. Sometimes there’s nothing in the environment that’s obvious to us, but a dog can be aroused by a sound that we can’t hear or an odor that we can’t smell.

Playful Dog

It’s fairly easy to detect when your dog’s feeling playful. His body movements are jerky and bouncy. He might bounce around in exaggerated twists, turns and leaps. He might dodge around you, paw at you and then take off running to invite a chase. Or he might just jump on you and start mouthing. Dogs enjoy a variety of play styles, including chase games (in which the dog is either the chaser or the chasee), rough-and-tumble (wrestling or tackle) games, and games of “keep-away” with an object, like a toy or stick. Almost all play is interspersed with the characteristic “play bow” that’s common across all dogs. When your dog play bows, he bounces into position with his forelegs on the ground and his hind legs extended so that his rear sticks up. This signal is extremely important because so much of dog play consists of aggressive behaviors and dominant postures. The play bow tells a dog’s playmate, “Anything that comes after this is play, so please don’t take it seriously.” Some dogs also show a “play face,” a happy facial expression characterized by a partially open mouth that almost looks as though the dog is smiling. A playful dog might also growl or make high-pitched barks.

 

Read more: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/canine-body-language