Dog Guard® Out of Sight Fencing®

800-865-0495

20 Gurley Ave. Suite B1 Troy, NY 12182 | Email: Info@dogguardblog.com

About

Dog Guard® Out Of Sight Fence® understands: Your dog is family.

out of sight dog fence

We Love Your Dog Too!

Dog Guard® Out-of-Sight®  Dog Fence  knows just how important it is that your dog leads a safe and happy life. Dog Guard® “Out of Sight Fencing” allows your dog the freedom he deserves and provides you with peace of mind. Dog Guard® Out-of-Sight® Electronic Dog Fencing is a safe, affordable alternative to conventional fencing.

Dog Guard®  offers Out-of-Sight® Electronic Dog Fencing, veterinarian-approved, combination of animal training and state-of-the art electronics. Dog Guard Out-of-Sight Electronic Dog Fencing is a unique 2 zone T-4 transmitter allows a wide variety of corrections to be set for your pet at the transmitter depending on your dog and it’s temperament

 

Keep Pets Safe in the Heat

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Keep Pets Safe in the Heat

The summer months can be uncomfortable for your pets.
Basic summer safety
Never leave your pets in a parked car
Not even with the car running and air conditioner on. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels.
Limit exercise on hot days
Take care when exercising your pet. Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening. Blacktop gets very hot and can burn your pet’s paws, so walk your dog on the grass if possible. Always carry water with you to keep your dog from dehydrating.

Provide plenty of shade and water
Any time your pet is outside, make sure he or she has protection from heat and sun and plenty of fresh, cold water. In heat waves, add ice to water when possible. Tree shade and tarps are ideal because they don’t obstruct air flow.
Cool your pet inside and out
Whip up a batch of quick and easy DIY peanut butter popsicles for dogs and always provide water, whether your pets are inside or out with you.

Dog Grooming Tips for Summer

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Dog Grooming Tips for Summer

Summer—a season for picnics and water fun. Longer days and warm weather makes us want to get ourselves and our dogs outside to soak up some sun and get some exercise.
Maintaining our dogs’ grooming routines is important. It’s not all about looking good, it’s about keeping a close eye on the condition of our dogs’ skin, ears and nails, solving small problems before they become big ones.
Some dogs require the services of a professional groomer, all dogs benefit from a good brushing, and you don’t have to be a pro to do that. A dog’s best friend is a brush appropriate for his coat type, one that strips out loose hair so air can flow against his skin. Regular brushing can prevent mats, which are painful and they also trap heat and moisture and can result in skin infections.
Resist the urge to shave down your dogs, particularly those with double coats, who can be quite comfortable as long as those coats are well cared for. Whatever the length and composition, a dog’s coat provides built-in climate control as well as a first line of defense against sunburn, twigs and stickers.
This is also the time of year to be particularly alert about ticks and fleas. The former can carry disease and the latter can quickly set up housekeeping on your dog—and in your house—if not managed. While your dog may or may not agree, adding an extra bath or two is also a good summer strategy. Brush before and after, choose a shampoo that’s a good match for his skin and coat.
Check your dog’s ears regularly. Dogs whose ears fold over are prone to ear infections, which wet ears promote. After your dog takes a dip, wipe the inside earflap gently with a cotton ball; if your vet says it’s okay, you can also use drops that contain a drying agent. According to the Dog Owner’s Home Veterinary Handbook, a drop of white vinegar will also help prevent “swimmer’s ear.”
Continue to brush your dog’s teeth and pay attention to his paws. Check between his toes for ticks, other debris, and trim his nails.

What You Need to Know After Adopting a Pet

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What You Need to Know After Adopting a Pet

Now that you’ve adopted a new fluffy playmate into your family, you’ll want to make sure you get him or her off to a healthy and happy start in their new home. Although dogs normally require more of an adjustment time than cats, with the proper care and dedication you can have one of the most well-mannered pets around.

Help Familiarize Your New Pet

Your fuzzy friend has just scampered through the doorway of his new home for the first time. To get things off on the right start, it’s important to take your pet around the house on a leash to show him where things are located, such as his food and water bowls, pet bed, and toys. It may also be a good idea to take them around the yard so that he can familiarize himself with his new outdoor surroundings.

Your new pet may hide or keep to one area of the home at first, but that’s normal. The more comfortable they become with you and their new surroundings, the more sociable and outgoing they will become.

Housetrain Your Pet

When dealing with housetraining, consistency is key. A new puppy may be unable to control his bladder for more than a few hours at a time, so it helps to establish a routine. Take your new puppy outside every couple hours after eating or drinking, naps or playtime. Praising and rewarding your puppy with a treat immediately after they’re done can help reinforce good behavior.

How to make peanut butter popsicles

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How to make peanut butter popsicles

While you’re drinking an iced coffee, give your dog a summer time treat also. Here is an easy-to-make treat will keep her occupied
Peanut Butter popsicles
Ingredients
1 cup peanut butter, preferably unsalted and unsweetened (Check your peanut butter’s label to make sure it doesn’t contain any kind of xylitol, which is toxic to dogs.)
Half a ripe banana, mashed
Water as needed
In a small mixing bowl, combine peanut butter with a little water or half a mashed banana. (The water and banana aren’t essential, but they help with freezing consistency.)
Line a cookie sheet with wax paper, or use Kong-style rubber toys that have a cavity you can fill.
Spoon the mixture onto the tray just like you would cookie dough, or stuff it into the toys. Freeze the tray or toys for several hours or overnight. If you need to reuse the tray right away, pop out the cubes and store them in a bag or container in the freezer.
Serve, and turn any hot dog into a happy camper.
• Pet popsicles can be made out of all kinds of things your dog (or cats) eat normally, so experiment to see what your dog likes best.
• The frozen Kong-style toys make a great cool-down treat for when you will be away for a few hours.
• Try treats suspended in water, watered down wet food and favorite frozen veggies.
• Avoid: onions and onion powder, grapes and raisins, salt, macadamia nuts, tomatoes, potatoes, rhubarb leaves and stems,

Dog Guard of the Day

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Dog Guard of the Day

Our Dog Guard Out of Sight Fence keeps our little wanderer in the yard where he belongs. He was quick to learn his boundaries and loves being outside and free to roam!

Dog Guard Puppy of the Day

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Dog Guard Puppy of the Day

Meet Cooper! Copper is a 6 month old Border Collie and has been on the fence since she was 12 weeks old. Cooper loves to run for hours every day and Dog Guard allows her the freedom to run as much as she wants to!
Cooper2

Dog Guard® Out-of-Sight Fencing® System Layouts

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Basic Perimeter System With a garden or pool loop, or you can protect any other area you like.

Basic Perimeter System
With a garden or pool loop, or you can protect any other area you like.

 

Pinch Offs This creates 2 different zones. Allows you to keep your pet in which ever zone you like.

Pinch Offs
This creates 2 different zones. Allows you to keep your pet in which ever zone you like.

 

Double Loop Can cover 1, 2, or 3 sides of your property. Ideal for customers with traditional fencing on part of the property. Also great for Condo's or Duplexes.

Double Loop
Can cover 1, 2, or 3 sides of your property. Ideal for customers with traditional fencing on part of the property. Also great for Condo’s or Duplexes.

 

Dog Guard Dog of the Day

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Dog Guard Dog of the Day

Check out “Bo” – our Dog Guard Dog of the day! Let your dog run free and be safe with an underground Out of Site Pet Fence!

Tips For Keeping Your Pet Warm This Winter

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Tips For Keeping Your Pet Warm This Winter

For some of us, cold weather is regarded as a mere nuisance; for others, it’s a fun time filled with winter joys; and still others will find this time of bone-chilling weather and huge piles of snow a veritable nightmare to endure.

Whatever your viewpoint on winter, one thing remains the same for all of us with pets: it’s a time when our pets need a little extra care.
1. In or Out
You might want to keep your pets indoors during the freezing months, especially if you live in bitterly cold areas.
2. Bare Naked Truth
If you must keep your pet outdoors, consider this: Would a coat alone keep you warm against the elements? Well, your pet’s fur coat isn’t enough protection for your pet during winter provide your dog with a warm, dry, and draft free shelter outside
3. No More Frozen Dinners
Because it takes more energy to stay warm when it’s cold, outdoor animals eat more during the winter. Fresh, running water is vital for maintaining your pet’s health. Keep an eye on the water bowls and make sure it doesn’t freeze ovoer.
4. Latest Fad Diet
Indoor animals, meanwhile, have different dietary needs. They conserve energy by sleeping more in the winter. Dogs and cats also exercise much less when they do go outside, so you may need to adjust the amount of food accordingly.

Why Supervising Dogs and Kids Doesn’t Work

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Why Supervising Dogs and Kids Doesn’t Work

It’s sound advice given frequently: Supervise your dogs and kids while they are together. Breeders warn parents, “Don’t leave the dog alone with children, no matter how friendly the breed.” Veterinarians advise, “Never leave a dog and a child in the same room together.” Dog trainers explain, “All dogs can bite so supervise your dog when you have children over.” Everyone knows the drill. So why doesn’t it work? Why are there an estimated 800,000 Americans seeking medical attention for dog bites each year, with over half of these injuries to children ages 5-9?

In the featured image: Note the good intention of the kids. Note the closed mouth and half-moon eye of the dog. Intervene! Note the good intentions of the kids. Note the closed mouth and half-moon eye of the dog. Intervene.

The bites are not a result of negligent parents leaving Fido to care for the baby while mom does household chores, oblivious to the needs of her children. In fact, I’ve consulted on hundreds of dog bite cases and 95% of the time the parent was standing within 3 feet of the child watching both child and dog when the child was bitten. Parents are supervising. The problem is not lack of supervision. The problem is no one has taught parents what they should be watching.

Parents generally have not received any education on what constitutes good dog body language and what constitutes an emergency between the dog and the child. Parents generally have no understanding of the predictable series of canine body cues that would indicate a dog might bite. And complicating matters further, most parents get confused by the good intentions of the child and fail to see when a dog is exhibiting signs of stress. The good new is all of this is easy to learn! We can all get better at this.

Here is a simple list to help you improve your supervision skills:
Watch for loose canine body language. Good dog body language is loose, relaxed, and wiggly. Look for curves in your dog’s body when he is around a child. Stiffening and freezing in a dog are not good. If you see your dog tighten his body, or if he moves from panting to holding his breath (he stops panting), you should intervene. These are early signs that your dog is not comfortable.
Watch for inappropriate human behavior. Intervene if your child climbs on or attempts to ride your dog. Intervene if your child pulls the ears, yanks the tail, lifts the jowls or otherwise pokes and prods the dog. Don’t marvel that your dog has the patience of Job if he is willing to tolerate these antics. And please don’t videotape it for YouTube! Be thankful your dog has good bite inhibition and intervene before it’s too late.
Watch for these three really easy to see stress signals in your dog. All of them indicate you should intervene and separate the child and dog: Yawning outside the context of waking up
Half-moon eye – this means you can see the whites on the outer edges of your dog’s eyes.
Lip licking outside the context of eating food

Watch for avoidance behaviors. If your dog moves away from a child, intervene to prevent the child from following the dog. A dog that chooses to move away is making a great choice. He’s saying, “I don’t really want to be bothered, so I’ll go away.” However, when you fail to support his great choice and allow your child to continue to follow him, it’s likely the dog’s next choice will be, “Since I can’t get away, I’ll growl or snap at this kid to get the child to move away.” Please don’t cause your dog to make that choice.
Listen for growling. I can’t believe how many times I’ve heard parents say, “Oh, he growled all the time but we never thought he would bite.” Dog behavior, including aggression, is on a continuum. For dogs, growling is an early warning sign of aggression. Heed it. If growling doesn’t work, the dog may escalate to snapping or biting. Growling is a clue that you should intervene between the dog and the child.

To pet owners, particularly those who also have children, thank you for supervising your dog! As a dog trainer and mother of two, I know that juggling kids and dogs is no easy feat. It takes patience, understanding, and a great deal of supervision. I hope these tips will help you get better at supervising.

If you want more information about this topic, a great resource is Colleen Pelar’s book Living With Kids and Dogs Without Losing Your Mind.